Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Day 3 - "Boo"gle Docs


HAPPY HALLOWEEN!

Let's be honest, who hasn't at least heard of "Boo"gle... er... Google Apps? Most everyone has heard of them, but do we all know the powerful potential for enriching education that they bring to our classrooms? Let's begin with what Google Apps are, a suite of communication and collaboration tools, or apps, developed by Google. They are accessible through any web browser connected to the Internet and store the information created by the apps within the "cloud." There are tons of apps available in the suite including the one we're using right now (Blogger), but for this post let's contrain our discussion to the five main apps in the suite which are Gmail, Calendar, Google Docs, Groups, and Sites. Other tools in the suite will be discussed in future posts.

GETTING STARTED
Here are some places to start your foray into Google Apps:
  • Create an Account (for anyone that doesn't have a Google account already.)
  • EVSC Google Apps Login (All EVSC teachers have an evsck12.com account.)
  • Gmail Login (if you are a Google Apps for Education user you will need to use your full email address to login)

COLLABORATION AND SYNCING
Since all of you will undoubtedly share a plethora of terrific ideas for using Google Apps in the classroom, I thought that I would comment on two of the most basic and important features of Google Apps, namely the ability to collaborate and stay in sync. With regard to collaboration, what Google Apps has accomplished is a paradigm shift from the solitary or one person focused work of crafting documents to a new paradigm of collaborative creation and review. Now up to 200 people can view my documents simultaneously. (It would have taken me a long time to print and share that many copies under the old paradigm!) What's more, up to 50 people can edit that same document simultaneously, a feat that simply could not have been accomplished previously.

What this means is that the document creation software that many of us grew up with is no longer the best tool for document creation anymore. In our classrooms this means that students can work in groups and everyone can be in the document creating and editing at the same time. Documents can be shared instantly with groups of people, and those people can interact with my creation easily and efficiently. Notes no longer have to be individual; with Google Docs a master set of class notes could be made simultaneously by the entire class. It could also contain pictures, videos and links to supplement the ideas and content presented in class. I'm sure all of you will share some of your ideas on how to use the collaboration features of Google Apps in the comments - the possibilities are tremendous, especially when you add Calendar, Groups and other apps to the mix!

We can take this idea of collaboration beyond the classroom however. Imagine creating your common assessments with Google Docs. Now everyone has the most current edition and editing can be a collaborative experience. One common set of PLC notes can be kept in sync between all members and shared with administrators who can view the notes when they choose. Data collection can be accomplished with Forms and everyone can have instant access to the results. These are just a few ideas - share yours!

My other favorite feature of Google Docs is the ability to stay in sync. I'm sure that just like me you have multiple computers on which you work. When you add in laptops, tablets and smart phones it means that there are a lot places that document I need right now could be saved other than the device currently in front of me. With Google Apps my work is stored in the cloud, and the most up-to-date version of everything is available on all of my devices. With the new Google Drive I can also have access when there is no Internet connection. Everything in my Drive is synced to my computer and editable in the Chrome browser, even when there is no Internet available. What a great feature for those students without a dedicated Internet connection at home. Now they can have the collaboration when connected, but retain the ability to edit and create when accessing the Internet isn't feasible.

Thoughts On Sharing...
by Jerrad Gleim
  • Sharing is simple and you can do it while you're working on the document or from your Docs list. Simply push the Share button at the top of your screen and start typing in the names of people you want to share.  You can set their rights to Editor, Comments Only, or View Only. Google Docs will even send them an email letting them know the document is being shared to them.  It's that easy! 
  • Are you worried about people accidentally deleting information? Google Docs has Revision History so you can always restore the document to a previous date and time.
  • As you're editing a document, you are able to see a list of individuals who are viewing/editing the document at that moment. The user list also has a chat feature so you can communicate live while you work.
  • Did you create a document, spreadsheet, or presentation using another program? No problem. Upload it to Google Docs and then share it.
  • Do you want to share the information in a doc on a web page?  No problem. Google Docs can help you to share a web link with users and even allow you to embed the doc in another website so as the document changes, the website stays up to date.

RESOURCES

VIDEO TUTORIALS

YOUR CHALLENGE: 
If you use Google Apps already what impact has it had on your classroom? How can you further extend the use of Apps to engage your students and enrich your curriculum? If you do not use Google Apps presently, in what ways might you envision it being used? For everyone, how could Google Apps make things easier for teachers? Consider not only your classroom but your department, building and district as well.

62 comments:

  1. I have recently begun using Google Docs and Google Calendar in my classes. Both my Shepard Academy and AP Lit/Comp Weebly websites have Google calendars embedded into them where I post due date for reoccurring assignments - every Monday a Legal Lad is due, every Thursday a Socratic Seminar, long range projects, and short terms tasks - tests, quizzes, papers, It's quick and easy to create and populate the calendar, as well as edit it. Google Calendar has been a great addition. I've created peer editing groups in Google docs and have most recently used it to share documents with my AP class to work on sentence clarity. All students have a sentence to revise in real time. The document is displayed on my Promethean board, so we can watch the revisions as they occur and comment on them. I'm looking for more ways to use Google docs in my classes.

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    1. Hey Heather! It sounds like you already have some great GoogleApp integrations! I agree that Google Calendar is the easiest way to create and share a calendar with a group. Once it is embedded in your website or blog you never have to update it there again. Any changes you make through the Google Calendar website are immediately visible on the embedded versions. Students always have a place to go to find the most up-to-date information. What's more, if the students add your calendar to their Google Calendar account everything you add, delete, or change on your calendar will show on their personal calendar! If students were taught how to keep themselves organized with this tool, and teachers shared their calendars, this could be really powerful!

      An idea... You can attach Google Docs to your appointments by enabling it in the "Lab" settings. Here is a link to more information: http://bit.ly/X0z5nO. With this enabled you could just refer students to calendar events to get copies of handouts and other information.

      Getting students to work collaboratively is truly important, and it sounds like you are using Google Docs to do just this. There are many great uses for this tool and I'm sure you'll get some more great ideas as the comments start to flow today!

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  2. I have used google docs this year in 3 ways. First, students in my Business Math classes collaborated together on presentations regarding the ABC's of Careers. Each team had to make slides A through Z of a career idea (actual career research or idea in a job(dress, appliaction, etc). They were able to work together on the same presentation at their own times and without havin to rely on the other team member to bring a flashdrive. Each team also made me a contributor so I saw progress and WHO was doing
    what work. Second, as th emath department began discussing GVC's; we made a google doc for department members to collaborate on at each person's own pace and time and speciality. Thirdly and most recent, students in the the same business math classes mentioned above worked on a budget sheet made in Excel/spreadsheet form and as they bought items or got paid randomly through a game format they entered their expenses. This was awesome! It showed the students that if they share an account with someone (future spouse, friend) and both are spending money... there goes the money! Excitement and energy around the room as people who were sharing accounts used vocabulary words to tell the other one to quit spending as their accounts were dipping and being charged fees!

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    1. Hey Leah! Very cool ideas! It is always exciting to see students collaborating and working together. I think these tools also have great potential for teacher collaboration. When you can work together to plan and share it will always be beneficial to students. What is great is that teachers can work when and where they want and everyone always has the most up-to-date information.

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  3. I took a stab at google docs last year when students were choosing topics for a math research paper. I didn't want any topics to be duplicated, so I had students type in a spreadsheet what they were planning. It worked very well, and students could go back and change their topics, if they wanted.

    This year, I had students submit summaries through google docs.

    On my Advanced Ed committee, we shared our thoughts and resources that we had gathered to support our standards.

    I think it is a powerful tool, and I want to explore its classroom applications more this year.

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    1. Hey Beth! These are good ideas. Think now about how you can get students collaborating via the shared workspace that is Google Apps. This site lets you search for lesson plans that use Google products. Might be a place to browse and steal some ideas! :)

      http://www.google.com/edu/teachers/lesson-plan-search.html

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  4. I switched over to Google Docs last year and haven't looked back since. The cloud storage alone is worth the move because I always have access to all of my files regardless of what device I am using. I also love the fact that it is so easy to collaborate with others. We put up our weekly meeting agendas on Google Docs and everyone on the team can contribute agenda items. Then, during the meeting, the whole team is collectively taking notes, enhancing the agenda items so that the agenda becomes an interactive set of meeting minutes. Our team has also collaborated to create presentations that are every bit as good as powerpoint. The best part of that is that we can then share the link to the presentation with our attendees. Moreover, the ICATS organized and designed the entire eRevolution conference inside a Google spreadsheets workbook. Even though we were located all across the country from one another this past summer, all of us had a shared space that was always up-to-date to help us plan. I've been gradually collecting some Google Resources in this LiveBinder: http://www.livebinders.com/play/play?id=480310 Cheers!

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    1. I HIGHLY recommend Tim's LiveBinders! If you haven't seen his binder of Web 2.0 tools you really need to check it out. Lots of great, organized resources!

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  5. Our Leadership team uses Google Apps to share leadership notes. This makes it nice for all notes to be seen by faculty; plus, it is convenient when our usual secretary is absent, we can just jump on Google Docs and create a new set of minutes. There is no emailing attachments and all that. Our entire school's calendar is also on a Google Calendar.

    One problem we have run in to w/Google Apps is uploading documents that were created in another program, such as Word. The formatting is different, and this has discouraged many of our grade level PLCs from sharing documents this way. They, instead, have opted to use Dropbox.

    As far as our elementary students, Google Docs is a LIFESAVER! Gone are the days of having young students labor over typing a piece of writing only to have it "not save." It also makes it nice for printing and storage because the teacher no longer has to use her jump drive to save and print the pieces of writing. She can just jump on Google Apps and print, not to mention check up on progress in the middle of the publishing time.

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    1. Thanks for sharing that formatting doesn't always work right. I am an avid user of Dropbox and I love that my files are just as I saved them. One reason I have not switched to the cloud is for the formatting--I didnt know if my documents would be changed.

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    2. Hey Kati! Sure wish Blogger had that auto-save thing, I just lost my whole reply to you! Anyway... You have hit on some on the most popular features of Google Apps. First, not having an inbox full of meeting agendi and minutes is completely worth the switch. Also, the auto-save feature removes from kids the "I had the whole thing completed and then my cat knocked the fish tank onto my computer which started smoking and we had to evacuate but when we got back inside my work was gone and it was really good too so can I have a few extra days?" excuse. You the ones :)

      As far as formatting, you are right, when Google converts Word docs formatting is sometimes lost. You can, however, tell Google not to convert the document as long as anyone you are going to share it with has Word or something that can open a Word file. In this instance Google will save the doc as a Word file into your new Google Drive where you can share it just like other docs. You lose the collaboration features but can still share and maintain formatting. I have been helping some counselors set-up Google Drive to share ISP's with each other, the administrators and social worker. By saving to Google Drive they maintain the ability to edit the Word form. They gain the ability for anyone on the team to edit that document and have the changes shared with the team moments later. Everyone always has the most current info regardless of which member of the team the student see. A great example of collaboration and communication that directly benefits students.

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  7. I put a standards committee document on Google Docs for all to edit last year. I thought it would save all the emails. Many of the teachers didn't seem to know how to use it yet though. At the beginning of this year, I started my classes with a Google Doc presentation. Each student inserted two slides of various information to create a class profile. It was a great way to start the semester and learn about each other.

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    1. I love the idea of doing slides to share information about themselves. I think I could use this in Spanish with all kinds of writing/vocabulary practice activities.

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  8. I like to use the Google forms/spreadsheets to collect information. For example, I requested that parents fill out a contact information survey and posted it to the class website. I also created a form to survey students so that I could collect information about which novels they have previously read for other classes.

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    1. Hey Christina! I LOVE Google Forms for this. It is a quick and easy way to gather information and bring it in to a spreadsheet that you can manipulate and use in a myriad of ways. Using Flubaroo (linked above) you can build quizzes with Google Forms and then automatically score them and generate results.

      At the beginning of this year I started using gadgets along with spreadsheets to create little data reports/charts that I could embed on my website. One was for music memorization, for instance. As students memorized I marked them in the spreadsheet and the chart on the website instantly updated to reflect the new percentage of students with memorized music.

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    2. I would like to see more about how to set that up. I have something in my room I think that might work with--if I'm seeing it in my head as you describe! ;)

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  9. I love google aps, even though I know I am not using as many of the resources as possible. Google gave me a place to store my work and materials from angel and then onto MBC. I love the comment and sharing tools for my student work. We have also been utilizing the shared documents for team or teacher communications. One way we have been using the resource is to send out our weekly grade level news letter to parents! We have had some good feedback in regards to the communication.

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    1. Hey Jane! It sounds like you have a good start with Google! It takes us beyond static documents and turns them into a place to share and think and learn. Can you share with all of us how you utilize the commenting features of Google Docs?

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  10. I use Google Apps all the time with my students. It is a great way for us to share information digitally without having to print anything out. Student can get a link from the share button and enter that link into a Google Form I've created. That way I don't have hundreds of emails filling up my inbox and I can quickly sort who turned in their work. I click on the link submitted and I can comment on their assignment and they can see the graded assignment immediately. WE LOVE GOOGLE in my room! Sounds hard--but is actually really simple to set up!

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    1. It is simple and quite functional. In the early days Google Docs was pretty basic. If you haven't checked it out since then it you're missing out. The latest updates have brought terrific functionality. And once again we hear that recurring theme of freeing up some of that inbox!

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  11. After reading some of these posts I have some new ideas on how to use Google Docs with my students. I am not currently using them with my students, but have been using them with other teachers to share documents and information. I also sometimes use it to create documents I want to access at home or school.

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    1. I encourage you to dive in and incorporate them into something coming up. I think you'll find that just like many others have found they really do help better engage students and get them working together. If you are in the EVSC all of our iTeam members (eLearning Coaches and ICATS) are quite comfortable with Google Apps so please ask for some coaching from your building team member if you'd like some assistance getting up and running!

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  12. I have done several projects with Google docs. It is a great way to have students collaborate in their work. One of the best features I have found is that there is no need for students to "save" what they are working on. It is done automatically for them. Students still really struggle with basic file management and organization on their own devices and transferring files to different devices. Google docs gives them access to their work anywhere they have access to the Internet.
    While I have only done projects within a particular classroom I can see the potential of using Google docs to collaborate with students from other classes, subject matters, schools, and even countries.

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  13. I have used Google Docs for research papers and for creating group presentations. The thing I like most about Google docs for research papers is the kids can do their bibliography on Easybib.com and it has the option of uploading it to Google Docs. Before when you upload it to Open Office, the format would get messed-up. I have also used it to peer edit papers with students in other classes. Last year a 12th grade teacher had her students peer edit my 9th graders' papers through Google Docs.

    I like Google presenter because kids can work together easily. When they start the project each one takes part of the task and they can work on it even if they are absent.

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    1. I really like the idea of peer editing! What a great way for upper level students to apply their knowledge in a real world manner! We all know you never really know a subject well until you have taught it to someone else!

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  14. Our sixth grade team has created a 6th grade gmail account that we use to email parents, so we can keep track of all contacts home. We are also using the calendar to record when we make positive phone calls, as well as when we call parents about concerns. We believe this will improve communication with parents and will also keep us all informed about our students. I am excited to try the presentation piece with my classes.

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    1. Another great idea! Love the concept of a place where the entire team can track parent contacts! You could probably even just keep a team spreadsheet that could be sorted by student. Any way that works and keeps everyone informed that another teacher has already called home about this same issue! Knowledge is power!

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  15. At AIS last year, we used Google docs to record parent contacts that we made. This made sure everyone used the same format and the people with admin powers could see how many contacts we made, so we never had to submit our own every month like they used to. We could also see which students had contacts made, so we could make sure to branch out positive phone calls to more students.

    I now teach Latin at Reitz, but I also help with some Apex courses. We use Google docs to keep track of which students are in which Apex classes and which ones have completed the course. We've also been thinking about utilizing the Calendar for students so they can use it to keep track of assignments, due dates, as well as appointments and things outside of school. It's a great way to teach students how to stay organized and on top of their time schedule.

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  16. I use Google docs every day. It is so easy for students to turn in their work without using paper, and it keeps a record to prove they turned it in.

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  17. I use Google Apps rather frequently in my classroom. My students are all competing in the Reading Olympics and they are able to use netbooks to complete the projects that go along with the Reading Olympics. Upon completion of a project, my students share a Google Doc with me and I am able to give them feedback. They like using Google Docs because they do not have to worry about leaving a project in a locker or losing it on the bus.

    I have dabbled with the forms option on Google Docs before. I have recently been working on a form that students would use to input answers while they work on a Web Quest.

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  18. I first started using Google docs as an LLC member: we found it an effective way to take notes, especially during presentations. One person can only do so little, so I worked with a team to efficiently document important ideas. How much more would our students be able to remember if they were able to collaborate on the notes they took during class? Not that notes are the only (or best) way to use Google docs in the classroom.

    This summer, I used Google docs to deliver content to my university students since I opted not to use the provided LMS. My students were able to comment on the assignment to ask questions, post their ideas and receive feedback from others before creating the final product. They collaborated on group projects. One of the best projects I witnessed included designing a full-day professional development experience from the ground up. Twenty professionals, ranging from undergraduate through university instructors, collaborated on a working document, making corrections, additions, and feedback over a week to design what could be an incredible day of workshop break-out sessions and speakers. Watching the document change and grow mimics how we should learn. It is not a static, linear activity--learning. It is collaborative, sometimes messy, but potentially an incredible experience in and of itself.

    Of course, using Google docs as a way to survey students or faculty is a great way to utilize this free resource, especially with the growing trend of using data to drive instruction. Simple survey? After completing a unit, use the same survey to ask students three questions: (1) What did you like? (2) What did you not like? and (3) What would you change for next year?

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    1. Hey Missy! Terrific ideas! I too can vouch for the fact that collaborative note taking is really terrific. I found that it freed me to pay attention more since the responsibility for getting info down was not all on me.

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  19. I'm a big fan of Google Apps! I have embedded a Google Calendar into my class site, and my families love it. Our schedule for related arts changes daily, but because the information is on the calendar, my 4th graders know when to wear their tennis shoes for gym days. I also add tests, field trips, PTA meetings, special events, etc. It keep all of us organized.

    I use Blogger for my personal blog, as I reflect on various lessons, strategies, etc. It's super easy to use - love it!

    My 4th grade team uses Google Docs to share our minutes during each meeting. It helps keep us focused on what is discussed during our PLC. It's an easy reference as we prepare for the next meeting as well.

    I will be using Google Docs starting in December with my 4th graders.

    www.beardsbrains.com

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    1. I think using calendars like this is not only great for families but also models organizational skills in a public way for our students. Kids need to learn how to use technology to stay organized and Google Calendar is an easy way to do this.

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    2. Thanks for your feedback!

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  20. I co-teach 3 math classes with the same teacher and we use google docs to create lesson plans, projects, and class notes. We are able to work separately, yet "together" to create materials for our classes. We are getting ready to try to create a group project for our classes that would require our students to use google docs. No longer can they use the excuse that Susie is absent and all her materials are at home. Instead, everything will be waiting in the cloud so they can continue working. Our next mission is to master flubaroo and create an online test. Since all the high stakes tests are online, we feel the need to give our students more practice with this format. This one app makes everything easier and seamless. Lots of hassles have suddenly disappeared.

    As students in my school district are required touse Angel to save and turn in documents, they constantly have trouble saving them to their online account in a format that can be printed. Often times they think their work has been saved and uploaded and it hasn't. Google Docs eliminates all of that hassle. Who needs a flash drive anymore?

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    1. Agreed! And now with Google Drive you have a place for more than just your Google Docs.

      For those using MyBigCampus it should be noted that you can easily link your Google account to MBC and then seamlessly share docs right in your posts. Just make sure your docs are shared publicly so your students can see/access them.

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  21. I have never used Google Docs in my classroom, but I got some great ideas from reading all of these. First, I really liked Heather Coy's idea of editing sentences in real time on the Promethean board through Google Docs. I teach low level English lab classes, and I think this would be a more engaging way to do some of the grammar and writing review that they so desperately need but find dry and boring.

    Also, I hadn't thought about doing our GVC/curriculum map on Google Docs until I read Leah Simon's post. Before our next PLC meeting, I'm going to set this up.

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  22. I have been using Google Docs for students to share their work with me, again I prefer it over Angel because of the size of many files being too large for Angel. No need to make drop boxes, and it is saved. Last year we were having constant issues with students who would type their reports in Open Office, then something would happen and their netbook would need repaired. Well... once the netbook goes into repair it is often reimaged, and there goes that report that was never sent to me or saved in any other location.
    I have also had students share current articles with me, as well as recipes.
    I know there is even more to learn with Google Docs, and I am anxious to try some of the other ideas everyone has shared.

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    1. Another good point! If students save everything into their Google Drive and use Google Docs to create docs, losing information should be a thing of the past. If their netbook dies or disappears they can simply log in to Google on their new netbook and get back to work!

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  23. I have not used Google Docs as of yet. I currently use Dropbox with my team. I like that Google Docs has the cloud based so I can access it from anywhere. It also sounds like you don't have to download it onto your computer but rather just pull it up. I like that fact as it is different than the Dropbox. If I was confident that my parents had the access to computers and internet I feel I would use the calendar piece. I also think that if I was doing a group project that I wouldn't have to worry about the excuse of I couldn't meet with my team members. As a Science teacher if my students had a one to one I could see each of them keeping their science notebook using Google Docs. Each team could use a Google Doc to record their findings and then the whole class could see, share, and add. I love the automatic sync feature because it never fails that the power goes out or you get busy and think you saved it and then close out or someone else gets on the computer and closes out for you and you hadn't even saved it yet. The Google docs sync feature would take care of that. I can also see this being a powerful collaboration tool with other people in my building as well as across the corporation.

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  24. I have used Google docs in several ways. I have been a beneficiary of Christina Ingram's parent contact information at Plaza as well as integrating Google docs for both spreadsheets and research reports. Examples include last year having my students use spreadsheets to calculate their total cost of a trip to a foreign country in groups to integrate both PBL and our international theme. This year I have already had students sharing their goolge docs with me as a way to submit their first PBL project this year over house hunting to find the prices of homes in their neighborhoods.

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  25. It's funny, I use Google docs a lot for personal use, but can't seem to make the connection to use it for the classroom. Maybe this will be the motivation to get me started. I know being able to update my calendar from everywhere is incredibly helpful. And if you've never used Google Earth, well, I can hardly begin to describe what you're missing. I"m going to be having my AP students journaling and doing group projects in the second semester, so that will be an ideal time to put soem of the ideas I see here to good use.

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  26. OK, so I've only just started using Google Docs for my own school files so I can see them at home and school. I'm always perplexed how to use this technology with my students as they are third graders. Many of them are technologically savvy, but I need more elementary ideas how to use it with them. I LOVED some of the previous ideas. 2 of the third grades teach math/science and 2 teach reading/LA. I'm thinking I would love to plan with my math/science partner via Google. We are constantly emailing documents and ideas. We, instead, could get a google doc together that houses our plans and curriculum maps! Thanks again for all the great ideas everyone!

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  27. I have been using google docs for awhile now and find the forms to be the most beneficial. I use them for all manner of assessments. It also allows me to keep all manner of data concerning my students. and classroom inventories. It can be a great tool for any educator. It allows sharing among colleagues and students alike.

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  28. I have always been a fan of Google, especially it's price! Last year with the challenge, I began to learn more about the uses of Google docs, and made some forms for my students to use for quizes and surveys. I learned this summer that with EVSC, we have the option to require a log-in for forms and docs, which can save a lot of headache for teachers. One thing I didn't realize at first was that our email is different for the Google Apps for Education, it is @evsck12.com, not the usual @evsc.k12.in.us. Small difference, but if you don't know, it could make a big difference! Now I am using Google calendar embedded on my website, Docusign is integrated with Google docs now, and Sliderocket is also now integrated, so your slideshows are saved in your drive!

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  29. My students really enjoy using Google Docs. They feel that it is an easier way to share their work and they love that they do not have to write things out on paper. I can create Google Form worksheets for them and I can give immediate feed back to students on essays and writing assignments. It also helps to cut back on "lost" assignments. They cannot just lose their assignments, especially when computers are being fixed; as it is all saved right there in Google.

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  30. I use Google Docs often in class. I use it to share information with my students and love that it can be uploaded to My Big Campus! My students often choose it as their go-to tool for collaborating. I haven't done much with forms yet, so that is where I'd like to see improvement on my end. From what I've read here, forms are wonderful. I really need to get on board with this!

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  31. As the eLearning Coach at Lodge, I was asked to create a google form to track referrals. Now, when a teacher has to write a referral, they access the live link, input their information, and click submit. An e-mail is sent to both administrators while the originating teacher receives a copy as well. At any point, the administrators can log in, and show summary of responses to see real-time data for the building.

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  32. I am using Google docs (drive) to store all class files that go out to students. Integration with MBC is great because if I change it in Google it is updated in MBC.

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  33. I have only used Google docs that were created by others. I do see the advantage of creating docs and have students use google docs and google drive to store. Hope to learn more.

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  34. I love using Google Docs. All of my classes have individual collections and they immediately share a folder with me into which all of their English or Literature work goes. This way, they don't have to remember to hit "Share" every time and I am more likely to get work readily! We use Google Docs for assignments, eTexts, collaboration--you name it. I also love having it for a backup log of work I've done previously; I can save certain work to use as model examples in later years.

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  35. Great message. I enjoyed reading this blog. I love using Google docs. I especially love being able to pull up my information from any computer.

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  36. Google Docs is invaluable in the classroom. When we first got the netbooks, I had the kids keep all of their work in Open Office. It quickly became a problem because the netbooks would break and the kids would often lose all of their work during the repair process. A coworker introduced me to Google Docs and we never looked back. The kids compose all of their writings in a Doc. They are required to share it with me and give me editing rights. Then, I can highlight or give suggestions on the actual document.
    I love using it while they are writing, because I can go to their document and work on it with them at the same time. We can comment back and forth discussing ideas.
    I also use Google Forms to create assignments. However, I find using MBC just as beneficial.

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  37. The Lead Coaches have been using Google Docs to collaborate in many different ways. We have been able to develop PD for schools including Google Presentations without being in the same physical space--- a perfect solution for trying to workaround everyone's busy schedules. I have even taught my own children how to use Google Docs! We are doing some pre-planning for Christmas already.

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  38. I've been using Google docs for a few years now, I love the ease of sharing and collaborating! I use it only a daily basis to create and edit when I can't be in the same location as coworkers. With the students it was much easier to share out items than on our LMS Angel. Most recently I created a referral form for teachers to use so that they don't have to fill out a paper form and send it with the student. This saves time, money, and trees. Since most of us have used MS Word or Excel the transition is smooth and relatively pain free.
    I really liked using it for homework correction. I would assign a student to type their answer and then we would do group correction.

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  39. Google docs could be used by the student support team to keep a list of the students the team is working with and each person on the team can make notes and updates when they have contact with that student. This would allow everyone to be on the same page when they see the student or inbetween meetings. It is also being used by teachers to list parent and student contacts then the document can be accessed by the Counselor, Administrators and Social Worker.

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  40. We use google docs in all of our leadership meetings - and we use the forms feature all the time from PLCs to data collection for school improvement plan. In my class, I have used google docs for lab data. The whole class can add their data to the form and then be able to use and analyze class data for their lab reports.

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  41. We use google docs schoolwide to track our calls home. That way, we can approach the call with more information - say if a student has had multiple calls home on the same issue, or has never had any home contact from a teacher. The spreadsheets and documents and presentation layouts, etc. are so much more awkward and slow than I would like, but I know that with all of these people bug-checking, I just have to wait a little while and most of the kinks will be worked out.

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