Thursday, November 29, 2012

Day 21- ThingLink

Today's tool is ThingLink, a cool web tool for creating interactive pictures. Basically, ThingLink allows a user to upload a picture and then enhance it by adding various interactive buttons that point to websites, wikipedia articles, Twitter profiles and more. The interactive pic then lives at its own web address and can be shared in various ways including embedding the picture in websites or blogs.

Another great feature is that if you share your ThingLink pic with other, they can leave comments, making the experience more interactive. Here is a basic introduction to ThingLink:




The first time I played with ThingLink, I created this picture:




I could imagine using Thinglink in several ways. First, I could imagine creating interactive pictures that students could explore to learn about a topic. Imagine making a blueprint of Shakespeare's theater interactive, for example. I could share the link with students and ask them to share their impressions with me via the comments feature.

I also like the idea of having students create their own interactive images as a research project. A student could research a city and then could share what they learn about the city by placing links on a map of that city. They could even link other ThingLink images inside the master image.

Add to that the fact that they can basically upload any type of file to a Google Drive and link those files, and you have a very powerful research delivery tool.

Here are a few links to other ideas for using ThingLink in education:

Make Interactive Images on ThingLink Education
44+ Interesting Ways to Use ThingLink in the Classroom

Your Challenge

Play around with ThingLink. Create an interactive image to share with your class or to share in your comment to this post. Then, share how you have used ThingLink in class or how you imagine it could be used.

25 comments:

  1. I am ready to explore this with several different areas of math. I may bring this to a few areas in geometry second semester for sure with architecture ideas. Plus more. Wow. Good find!

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  2. I am so glad you shared this tool! It is new to me, but I can think of many ways I will use this in my classes. I could use it in world cultures in the form of virtual tours around countries. In social studies, I could have students create interactive Renaissance paintings or pictures associated with other content. Students could analyze various features of the artwork or picture and then link out to descriptions.

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  3. I would agree that the place I would use this would be with shapes. In mathematics we don't relate enough to the real world for our students so I would definitely try and use this tool when covering items like Triangles, and prisms. Etc...

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  4. I think this tools is SOOOO fun. I've shown my class this before, but haven't had the opportunity to embed it with an assignment. I've added it to our website for them to reference as a resource. I can see LOTS of uses with this and I can't wait to use it. I think this speaks to so many of the students skills. I think they will LOVE this once they get started using it!! GREAT TOOL!

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  5. Yet another great website! One that both my students and I can use. Students could use ThinkLink to create an interactive map of Huck and Jim's journey down the Mississippi - connecting the geographic locations to events in the book. I like the idea of using a ThinkLink image to introduce the setting of a play or novel or using it as an ongoing part of our study - we could trace the Joad's journey across the country to California in The Grapes of Wrath.

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  6. So neat! This can be used in a lesson, as a project, or as a virtual story web to name a few uses. I can see myself using it to enhance instruction for conic sections in Algebra 2 (or ANY topic, really) by embedding links to real world examples, uses in the workplace, video clips, and other documents. I can't wait to play with this in my free time!!

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  7. I like it as a way to introduce a topic to a student. For example, showing a picture of an atom and having links over the different particles. I also like it as a way for a student to put together a project. I also like it as an interactive checklist for a lesson. You could have links to the different content, worksheets, videos over a picture of your own design.

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  8. This would be amazing to use when presenting the Odyssey and trace Odysseus' trip with perhaps short youtube videos about what happened there.

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  9. I like the idea of using it to introduce new topics to students. It may be useful for teaching students the different symbols in music by letting them navigate around the staff to learn about them.

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  10. That's so awesome! I can totally picture setting up virtual tours for important Roman sites like the Colosseum or Circus Maximus. I think that would be a really cool project for students to work on. I also really like other people's ideas about using it to show journeys like the Odyssey, or perhaps the Aenied or the Argonautica.

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  11. I could see our younger students using this to retell stories. I could see all of our students using this to tell about core experience trips we've been on. We have also recently attended the Kristina Smekens training, and I think this would be fabulous to have the kids "label" certain parts of a picture, which is one of the first steps for our young writers. With that being said, when I try to get to the website, I am only seeing text w/no pictures or "buttons" to click on. I am hoping to try it out for myself when I get home and have better luck. Has anyone else had this problem?

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  12. Once I got the email verification message, I could access the site.
    Here is a personal pic that I played around with just to try it out.

    http://www.thinglink.com/scene/330788338556469249#

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  13. I saw this at E-Rev last summer and I am glad you reminded us of it again. You have to LOVE the E-Rev Conference are u signed up yet for this summer? I know I am going! So back on topic I can see my students using this in both Science and Social Studies. We are covering the Structures of Life right now with Crayfish and Plants. I am going to try and have my students create one on their crayfish in its natural habitat and for Social Studies one on the Indidan Regions or as an interactive tourist attraction that is their favorite in IN. I like the idea of using this as an intro to a topic but also could see it as a check to see if they understood what was covered and using it as an assessment piece. Thanks again for reminding us of this great tool.

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  14. Want to totally use this to present ideas to the class! Time for our geometry unit. How about a pic pointing out geometry terms and links to brainpop, jr videos, online games, and definitions, etc. I would also like to have the kids do research of a plant and present it with the program! Thanks for sharing!

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  15. I can think of uses for this in many subject areas. We are currently starting a chemistry unit in science. This would be a great way to add some notes and information to an image of the periodic table. I like some of the other comments I read about using it in math with shapes. In literature, it would make a great novel project, or an easy way to build background knowledge.

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  16. You could create a webquest with all of the links on a picture, so students would not have to type in the address. It would be interactive, so they could decide how they wanted to use it. I think it would be great to assign students to do their own presentations and use the Promethean board to present.

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  17. I immediately shared this with several colleagues. Since I don't have much free time right now, I searched the already created thinglinks and found an awesome one on parabolas which has given me several ideas for ones I want to create in the future. I can see many applications for all subject mattters with this.
    What a cool way for students to do a research presentation, booktalk, or for a teacher to introduce a lesson. This is on my list of things to create in the future.

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  18. I think this reminds me of Prezi, but a little simpler. I can use this in my classroom to assign a musician or composer and have the kids do a report on them using ThingLink. I like that it is self contained, and really easy to navigate. My second semester Music class is going to have so many tools to use!

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  19. I agree with Jolie - it reminds me of a simpler version of Prezi.

    I can think of 3 ways to jump in and use this tool immediately. (I am responsible for all subjects in 4th grade except science.)
    1. Social Studies - My students are working on famous Hoosiers, and a small part of their assignment involves identifying their Hoosier's birth place on a map, etc. We could make one map with all our famous Hoosiers, with links to more sites about them, etc.

    2. Reading - When working on a specific reading strategy, such as "making connections," you could take a picture of the paragraph/page, etc., and then provide your notes about that strategy. This is a way to show students your thinking as you model the strategy.

    3. Writing - This tool could provide a much more effective way of sharing student work. Take a picture of the student's work and then provide notes/connections/links. For example, a student's paper that demonstrated a strong topic sentence could be compared to a strong topic sentence in a picture book.
    I plan to try these activities. I always love it when you share a tool that can be embedded into my site - big time bonus!

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  20. I think this program would be fun to use with my students. I am really looking forward to exploring it more and then get started using it.

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  21. I have been looking for something like this! I want to have my students take their own pictures and add comments about different aspects of themselves, using their senses as inspiration. Any kind of cheesy handout I could make pales in comparison. THINGLINK. Awesome.

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  22. I agree with the Prezi comments! I actually find Prezi extremely difficult to navigate (NOT a very good spatial thinker!) and love the structure of this. The kids will also enjoy it. We could do our own versions of Google Lit Trips or take notes together or create an interactive "scavenger hunt" of information! I also like that it offers other work already created!

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  23. This site would be awesome for teachers to use as they begin building digital curriculum for their 1:1 initiative. Adding the links allows the teacher to explain information as it relates to the topic or content studied. This would also be a great way for students to demonstrate their knowledge or understanding of content as they add their own links or comments.

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  24. This sie will be so great for the students to work on various presentations! The first one that comes to mind is when they are studying food customs from other countries. They could link recipes, information, pictures and video. Anything "new" appeals to them more than me assigning a traditional written report! I could use this to introduce a lot of topics, one that would be beneficial would be when introucing the nutrients - that is one topic that has a lot of information that does not always seem to "click" with them. Thanks for sharing!

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  25. On classmint users can upload their photo and can annotate their photo according to their wish.Classmint has image,text and audio annotation.lassmit.com is cool – super cool. It’s an easy and awesome way to interactively annotate an image online, including text descriptions, links, comments, and more. The uses for classmint.com are endless. to know more about classmint.com, feel free to visit classmint.com.

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